Session Descriptions

Session Descriptions 2019-05-21T19:26:46+00:00

 JUNE 25, 2019 PRE-CONFERENCE TRAININGS:

In addition to the regular conference, the following two training add on options are being offered:

  1. Course 1 (to be held at Red Lion Hotel Pasco)- dynamic six-hour course with lunch provided and Key Points packet. 8:30 to 3:30pm.
  2. Course 2 (to be held at Red Lion Hotel Pasco)- dynamic six-hour course with lunch provided. 8:30-3:30 pm. **Please note Course 1 is a prerequisite for Course 2.**

Above trainings are not included in regular conference ticket and must be purchased as an add-on.  Purchase here…


JUNE 26, 2019 SESSIONS:

7:15-8:15AM

Morning Mindfulness | Teresa Posakony | Pool Area 

N.E.A.R. to YOU Mindfulness Practice:

Join our inspiring morning awareness and mindfulness practice.  Come understand NEAR Science through guided movement and mindfulness exercises.  Deepen your understanding of your own inner state and expand your capacity for connection, learning, health, and growth – FLOURISHING! Consider joining a 6 week community of practice to grow your personal Resilience well beyond the conference.

Teresa Posakony is passionate about building healthy and resilient communities and organizations. She consults and teaches from the self-healing communities model founded by the FPC Community Networks which includes living systems, complexity, community engagement, dialogic organization development, and NEAR Science solutions.  She loves facilitating the statewide community of practice for ACEs and Resilience, and teaching neuroscience-based mindfulness practices.

8:15-9:45AM

KEYNOTE: Building Resilience across the Life Span: CRI’s Living SystemStages for Ages Part 1 | Teri Barila & Rick Griffin | Olympic/Gold Rooms

“What is predictable is preventable”, is a statement forever burned in Teri’s brain. With 20-years as a biologist studying hydroelectric, irrigation, politics and fish systems of the Pacific NW, her lens on preventing adverse childhood experiences was quite unique as she entered this new field. In her work with salmon and steelhead she came to deeply appreciate the living system theory: that nature is a continuum of organized repeating patterns. While studying fish as indicator species and their connection to environmental outcomes,  she connected the predictable patterns between adverse childhood experiences to adult and community outcomes.

Join Teri and Rick as they explore this year’s conference theme Building Resilience across the Life Span. Taking that perspective of biological systems, they will draw similarities from CRI’s eight-stage change cycle of initiative and community capacity building as they “story tell” the application of these stages to ages represented in the conference graphic, from prenatal through community. By recognizing patterns that impact the human biological, social and cultural ecosystem, they will “story tell” highlights of CRI’s 10-year initiative of building community resilience through the lens of community (Teri) and practitioner (Rick).

10:00-11:30AM

Big Idea: Why a Focus on Resilience? | Teri Barila | Bronze Room

“There comes a point where we need to stop just pulling people out of the river. We need to go upstream and find out why they’re falling in” (Desmond Tutu).  This quote captures the essence of why resilience matters. To CRI, Resilience is not about “lifting yourself up by your bootstraps” or “bouncing back” from serious harm or injury. To us, Resilience is about self-discovery and self-awareness based on what the ACE Study, neurobiology, and epigenetics tells us about our development. It is about building a community that models and promotes mutual help and reciprocity universally, across all social domains, so that individual resilience is buoyed by collective, community resilience. When we go upstream to understand the root causes and negative behaviors connected to trauma, we can then explore the opportunity to become aware of our own defenses, how we have learned to protect ourselves from the wounds our personal life experiences have left, to move into inquiry and insight to face the fear and beliefs that set the barriers up in place to begin with.  We then can recognize the freedom in finding the love, trust and safety that moves us beyond our fear-based default patterns, to help, hope and healing that is reciprocated throughout the community. It is discovering that a rising tide lifts all boats. Explore how CRI saw the focus on Resilience as the rising tide, and how we began to transform mindsets and hearts both individually and at a community-wide level through an understanding of contextual resilience, learning and supported by each other. Words matter, and the word “resilience” as we use it here at CRI, is to welcome all to the table, to learn what it means to be resilient, and to help buffer the negative effects we each have experienced, based on our own exposure to “isms”. This is about community co-care, and how we created a community conversant in ACEs, brain architecture and most importantly, Resilience.

Teri Barila is a co-founder and current CEO of the Community Resilience Initiative.  She holds a MS in Fisheries Management and a BS in Biology. She uses her science background to communicate with precision the science of ACEs and resilience.  She is involved extensively in training, consulting, writing and researching in the area of trauma, resilience and community capacity building. Her work has attracted attention in a variety of venues, in part due to the focus Teri places on grassroots organizational development and the focus on the hope of Resilience.

 

Incorporating Strength-Based Tribal History and Resilience in the Classroom |  Jefferson Greene  | Harvest Room

This trauma-informed session will illustrate how to promote understanding and healing within communities by incorporating “Since Time Immemorial” curriculum. This curriculum was created and approved by the Tribes of Washington State. I will focus on “Living in Celilo” which explores the cultural, economic, and historical significance of Celilo Falls through a storyline method of teaching while highlighting resiliency.

Living amongst his endangered cultural ways of teaching and living, Jefferson Greene works to reach generations. Culturally and academically educated, working in circles of cultural healing, trauma, arts, history, education, entrepreneurship, fatherhood, and community development, Greene shares his life amongst the Columbia Plateau Indians to help students’ find inner self and resiliency.

Becoming Trauma Informed Starts with Objective Self Awareness Part 1| Shasta Meyers & Brigette Phillips  | Spruce Room

The class will start with self reflection and focusing on how our own past adversities affect our daily decisions, opinions, judgements, behavior and way of life and how self awareness allows us to become trauma informed. Participants will engage in activities that will encourage them to reflect inwardly and start to recognize behaviors, etc., that may have been subconscious. Participants will create an art journal using various media to reflect on what they learned and how art can help them to continue their healing process.

Shasta Meyers and Brigette Phillips have a passion for individuals who are dealing with grief, childhood trauma, domestic violence, sexual assault, or other traumatic experiences. Combined they have many years of Trauma Training, Servant Leadership Training, Chemical Dependency Training, Stephen Ministry Training and have work with hurting individuals, families and communities, improving self-esteem, coping skills, and mindset.

 

 

 

How Hope Allowed Brings Awareness and Resilience to Women Living With the Consequenses of Childhood Trauma | Sue Mocker | Sage Room

Hope Allowed is an organization driven to bring about healing to adult women who have experienced childhood traumas. We do this through a four day Retreat devoted to helping participants gain deeper understanding to how their past is affecting their present. We believe when a woman gains healing and insight, then those in her sphere of influence benefit, a ripple effect.

Sue Mocker is the Founder and Executive Director of Hope Allowed which facilitates A Day
of Brave retreats, conferences, and workshops bringing awareness, validation and empowerment to those who are survivors of adverse childhood experiences.
Her passion is making a difference in the lives of adults who make a difference in the lives of children.

Derailing the School to Prison Pipeline During Elementary School | David Diehl | Oak Room

Would you like to gain a better understanding of how student-teacher relationships during elementary school can affect the entrance to the School to Prison Pipeline?  This session will provide insight into street socialized youth and why relationships can deflect their trajectory into the criminal justice system.  A retired police sergeant turned alternative education teacher, will share why increased awareness into the lives of street socialized students from marginalized communities can improve student engagement and impede future incarceration.

David Diehl is a retired Police Sergeant and is currently a Vice Principal for a Model Continuation High School in California. He is former court school educator and has worked extensively with gang and system involved youth. He is a Doctoral candidate, holds a M.S. in Administration, a M.S. in Human Resource Management, and a B.S. in Organizational Behavior.

 

Community Track Session: Collective Impact Through Collaborative Learning | Kody Russell | Design Room

Systems have largely been built on mental models that believe individuals are always “in control” and make “choices” about their behavior. Science about trauma has shown this fundamental assumption is wrong! How can we support leadership teams across systems in our community to learn this science, think critically about their services from a new perspective, and adopt trauma-informed practices and innovative approaches to help clients/staff flourish? Come learn about Kitsap Strong’s Collaborative Learning Academy (CLA) an innovative approach to building organizational knowledge and capacity across nearly 50 organizations and schools to become a trauma-informed community.   

Kody Russell is the Executive Director of Kitsap Strong, an engaging and entertaining “MASTER Trainer” certified in the ACEInterface NEAR sciences (neuroscience, epigenetics, Adverse Childhood Experiences – ACEs, & resiliency) curriculum, who uses storytelling & lived experience to help people understand complex information. As Executive Director, Kody provides support to 100+ agencies working to implement NEAR sciences & become a trauma-informed community.

 

The Connection between Bullying and Adverse Childhood Experiences | Jan Urbanski & June Jenkins, M.Ed.  | Pine Room

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are traumatic childhood events that can have lasting effects on a person. ACEs have been linked to chronic health conditions, risky behaviors, and even early death. For children who are bullied, the prolonged, repeated abuse can impact development, relationships, and school performance. Strategies to address ACEs and prevent bullying will be presented.

Jan Urbanski, Ed.D. is Director of Safe and Humane Schools at Clemson University where she oversees the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program and related initiatives to reduce bullying and violence. Dr. Urbanski has 24 years of school district experience as a prevention specialist, elementary teacher, and professional school counselor. She has also authored several publications and curriculum related to bullying prevention.

June Jenkins, M.Ed., is the Training Coordinator with Safe & Humane Schools at Clemson.  With more than 25 years of experience in education as teacher and administrator, she retired in 2014, as Project Director of Safe Schools/Healthy Students in Charlottesville, VA.  She holds a Postgraduate Professional License from VA and SC Departments of Education in PK-12 administration and supervision. She completed a postgraduate certification in PBIS from USF.  She is a founding member on the Leadership Board of the SC-APBS Network and is a Youth Mental Health First Aid Instructor.

Holistic Curriculum: A High School Classroom Designed for Personal & Academic Growth Emily Torres & Sean Barrett | Project Room

Our trauma-impacted Science/English/Psychology class is in its fourth year developed as a school within a school, in collaboration with developmental researchers, psychologists, and mental health experts. Student success is supported by way of individual personal growth through focus on human connection, suffering, attachment theory and relationships, family struggles and the home environment, loneliness, suicide, and related topics.

Four years ago Emily Torres helped pilot a program for trauma-impacted students. It is unique in that it brings a counselor into the classroom and uses curriculum designed around self-awareness. I have the privilege of working alongside psychologists to develop and implement this special curriculum. My goal is to show others how it can be implemented in all schools.

Sean Barrett is a mental health counselor and marriage and family therapist, with focus on attachments within family systems and parenting. I have had the high honor of working with Emily Torres in the program she has created over the last three years, and have both taught and offered support in the unique and powerful atmosphere that offers tangible student results.

11:30Am-12:45PM 

Lunch & Resilience Awards | Olympic/Gold Rooms

Why is CRI creating a National Resilience Champion Award?

CRI is the nation’s first Resilience community network and first national leader in the effort of restorative practices through healing from adverse life experiences. The goal of the CRI movement is to hold all persons “in grace” and to contribute to individual and community thriving. Contextual community resilience is our emphasis and helping to share that message is our passion. In our journey to establish a community level effort, we have found many champions along the way who have directly furthered the movement through their “feet on the ground” efforts. Today, we want to honor three champions who have inspired the development of critical mass and have been energetic catalysts of new ideas. The three women we recognize today have represented tipping points in the national movement. They have worked tirelessly to shift culture and mindsets around how human restoration occurs and have provided brilliant insights to reframe beliefs about the impact of an individual’s life experiences.  We hold the sciences close to us, including the art of celebration, so please join us in celebrating our first National Resilience Champions.

12:45-2:15PM

Big Idea: Coaching and Consultation | Rick Griffin | Bronze Room

There is a Chinese proverb that states, “If you want 1 year of prosperity, grow grain. If you want 10 years of prosperity, grow trees. If you want 100 years of prosperity, grow people.  The benefits are evident; yet, the real question becomes, “how do you grow people?”.  CRI’s Trauma Coaching and Trauma Consultation Training answers this question. Schools, organizations, and parents are discovering that the traditional “command and control” style of working with challenging behavior is no longer effective in today’s environment; which requires rapid response, leveraged creativity, resilience, and endless empathy in order to be productive. However, trauma-informed professional development training is not enough. After ten years of dedicated work in the community, CRI has found that an intentional and repetitive approach within a framework of support brings about this effective community change. CRI uses the acronym KISS to illustrate this community framework approach.  KISS is our community capacity building framework for Resilience, Knowledge, Insight, Strategies and Structures. Trauma-informed trainings typically address only the “Knowledge” (content). While K is important, CRI has learned that the “I” (insight) is critical. Insight leads to empathy, connection, and healing. And that comes with practice, practice, practice. Much like working out at the gym, we must practice the new strategies and build the new muscle memory (neural pathway) for our brain as we do for our body. With constant, consistent coaching and support for practice, we “Grow people” with a trauma informed lens, in patience and love.

Without coaching and ongoing consultation, training rapidly loses its effectiveness, and often fails to achieve the lasting behavioral changes needed. Training is important, but it is an “event”. Coaching and consultation are the ongoing practice, which is a valuable next step to ensure that the new knowledge imparted, actually becomes learned behavior.  The CRI Trauma Coach and Trauma Consultation training is the start to that process.  Our approach is practical and engaging, ensuring participants are equipped with skills that can be applied immediately. This Big Idea session gives attendees an overview of the simple but powerful tools taught in CRI’s on-going process of trauma related skill development.

Rick Griffin is currently a CRI Master Trainer. Rick holds a Masters degree in Education and uses his education to develop cutting-edge content and to deliver engaging presentations. He speaks to thousands of groups all over the country and is widely recognized for his work with trauma-informed practices.  His experience allows him to consult seamlessly with schools, businesses, and community organizations.

 

Incorporating Strength-Based Tribal History and Resiliency in the Classroom |  Jefferson Greene  | Harvest Room

This trauma-informed session will illustrate how to promote understanding and healing within communities by incorporating “Since Time Immemorial” curriculum. This curriculum was created and approved by the Tribes of Washington State. I will focus on “Living in Celilo” which explores the cultural, economic, and historical significance of Celilo Falls through a storyline method of teaching while highlighting resiliency.

Living amongst his endangered cultural ways of teaching and living, Jefferson Greene works to reach generations. Culturally and academically educated, working in circles of cultural healing, trauma, arts, history, education, entrepreneurship, fatherhood, and community development, Greene shares his life amongst the Columbia Plateau Indians to help students’ find inner self and resiliency.

Becoming Trauma Informed Starts with Objective Self Awareness Part 2| Shasta Meyers & Brigette Phillips  | Spruce Room

The class will start with self reflection and focusing on how our own past adversities affect our daily decisions, opinions, judgements, behavior and way of life and how self awareness allows us to become trauma informed. Participants will engage in activities that will encourage them to reflect inwardly and start to recognize behaviors, etc., that may have been subconscious. Participants will create an art journal using various media to reflect on what they learned and how art can help them to continue their healing process.

Shasta Meyers and Brigette Phillips have a passion for individuals who are dealing with grief, childhood trauma, domestic violence, sexual assault, or other traumatic experiences. Combined they have many years of Trauma Training, Servant Leadership Training, Chemical Dependency Training, Stephen Ministry Training and have work with hurting individuals, families and communities, improving self-esteem, coping skills, and mindset.

 

 

 

How Hope Allowed Brings Awareness and Resilience to Women Living With the Consequences of Childhood Trauma | Sue Mocker | Sage Room

Hope Allowed is an organization driven to bring about healing to adult women who have experienced childhood traumas. We do this through a four day Retreat devoted to helping participants gain deeper understanding to how their past is affecting their present. We believe when a woman gains healing and insight, then those in her sphere of influence benefit, a ripple effect.

Sue Mocker is the Founder and Executive Director of Hope Allowed which facilitates A Day
of Brave retreats, conferences, and workshops bringing awareness, validation and empowerment to those who are survivors of adverse childhood experiences.
Her passion is making a difference in the lives of adults who make a difference in the lives of children.

Derailing the School to Prison Pipeline During Elementary School | David Diehl | Oak Room

Would you like to gain a better understanding of how student-teacher relationships during elementary school can affect the entrance to the School to Prison Pipeline?  This session will provide insight into street socialized youth and why relationships can deflect their trajectory into the criminal justice system.  A retired police sergeant turned alternative education teacher, will share why increased awareness into the lives of street socialized students from marginalized communities can improve student engagement and impede future incarceration.

David Diehl is a retired Police Sergeant and is currently a Vice Principal for a Model Continuation High School in California. He is former court school educator and has worked extensively with gang and system involved youth. He is a Doctoral candidate, holds a M.S. in Administration, a M.S. in Human Resource Management, and a B.S. in Organizational Behavior.

Community Track Session: Resilience through the School Family:   An integrated mental health and school model to support students from early childhood to young adulthood Oliver Birchwood-Glover,  Olivia White,  Analizeth Pesqueira,  Nichole Vernon,  Tim Schroeder | Design Room

Every day, children ages pre-K to 19 arrive at school and bring with them their ACES, their trauma, their personal mental health challenges and the stress of social and economic barriers to school.   This has a direct impact on the social emotional health of the “School Family” and is a detriment to its resilience.  Incorporating mental health services at school reduces negative impacts and improves school resilience.

Oliver Birchwood-Glover MSW, LICSW, a 1993 graduate of New York University’s Ehrenkranz School of Social Work.  He trained simultaneously in the areas of psychoanalysis and psychodynamic psychotherapy, motivational interviewing and cognitive therapy techniques. He has trained and been certified as a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional (CCTP) and as a Certified Compassion Fatigue  Professional (CCFP), and as a clinical supervisor.

Olivia White, MA, LMHCA, CSC:Olivia is a trauma Informed mental health counselor with specialized training in Grief and Loss. She has a passion for working with children, youth and families and enjoys using creativity when working with clients. She enjoys counseling with a Person Centered approach using Cognitive Behavioral and Play Therapies to support clients in processing and building awareness.

Analizeth Pesqueira MSW, LSWAIC, SSW,has worked in schools supporting teachers, parents, and students’ social, emotional, and behavioral needs since 2013. She is a firm believer on the positive impact schools can have on students. She practices using person centered, person in environment, and systems theory approaches. She draws from Play Therapy, Trauma Focused CBT, and Solution Focused Brief Therapy principles to support needs of students. 

Nichole Vernon, M.Ed., LMHCA: Using a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Narrative Therapy approach, Nichole has worked in schools and community mental health settings with children, adolescents, adults and families supporting mental health concerns including anxiety, depression, and traumatic stress. Clients work with her in a secure environment to build awareness and skills to find resolutions that fit their goals while respecting their unique experiences.

Tim Schroeder, MSW, LICSW:Tim favors an Object Relations theory lens and values integrating relevant theories to understand clients and their world.His primary practice viewpoint is Choice Theory which allows for integration of a number of cognitive, behavioral, and mindfulness tools in developing relationships and empowering clients to find more effective ways to meet their needs.

 

The Connection between Bullying and Adverse Childhood Experiences | Jan Urbanski & June Jenkins, M.Ed.  | Pine Room

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are traumatic childhood events that can have lasting effects on a person. ACEs have been linked to chronic health conditions, risky behaviors, and even early death. For children who are bullied, the prolonged, repeated abuse can impact development, relationships, and school performance. Strategies to address ACEs and prevent bullying will be presented.

Jan Urbanski, Ed.D. is Director of Safe and Humane Schools at Clemson University where she oversees the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program and related initiatives to reduce bullying and violence. Dr. Urbanski has 24 years of school district experience as a prevention specialist, elementary teacher, and professional school counselor. She has also authored several publications and curriculum related to bullying prevention.

June Jenkins, M.Ed., is the Training Coordinator with Safe & Humane Schools at Clemson.  With more than 25 years of experience in education as teacher and administrator, she retired in 2014, as Project Director of Safe Schools/Healthy Students in Charlottesville, VA.  She holds a Postgraduate Professional License from VA and SC Departments of Education in PK-12 administration and supervision. She completed a postgraduate certification in PBIS from USF.  She is a founding member on the Leadership Board of the SC-APBS Network and is a Youth Mental Health First Aid Instructor.

Holistic Curriculum: A High School Classroom Designed for Personal & Academic Growth Emily Torres & Sean Barrett | Project Room

Our trauma-impacted Science/English/Psychology class is in its fourth year developed as a school within a school, in collaboration with developmental researchers, psychologists, and mental health experts. Student success is supported by way of individual personal growth through focus on human connection, suffering, attachment theory and relationships, family struggles and the home environment, loneliness, suicide, and related topics.

Four years ago Emily Torres helped pilot a program for trauma-impacted students. It is unique in that it brings a counselor into the classroom and uses curriculum designed around self-awareness. I have the privilege of working alongside psychologists to develop and implement this special curriculum. My goal is to show others how it can be implemented in all schools.

Sean Barrett is a mental health counselor and marriage and family therapist, with focus on attachments within family systems and parenting. I have had the high honor of working with Emily Torres in the program she has created over the last three years, and have both taught and offered support in the unique and powerful atmosphere that offers tangible student results.

2:30-4:00PM

Big Idea: Reaching the Tipping Point | Jane Ellen Stevens | Bronze Room

Reaching the national — and your local — tipping point. How can we do that in the next five years? And what happens when we do?

We REALLY need to reach a tipping point —ASAP! —in educating people about ACEs science, engaging organizations in the ACEs movement, and in helping them start the process of integrating trauma-informed and resilience-building practices throughout their work. Why? Mostly because this new knowledge has already shown us that we can solve our most intractable problems. My guess is that there are about 500 local ACEs initiatives in this country. But there are 30,000 cities and towns, and 4,000 counties in the U.S. A tipping point — that point where this movement becomes truly unstoppable, and practices based on ACE science become the norm instead of the new — is somewhere around 7,000 communities. Cities and counties can look at different tipping points within their communities: by sector, such as 20-30 percent of schools or health clinics. Or by geography, such as 20-30 percent of all organizations in a particular area. Both approaches are critical, because every sector needs to integrate trauma-informed and resilience-building practices. When we do that, then we can start measuring our progress — seeing where we’re doing well, and where we need to do more work. Yep, it’s a numbers game. There’s no getting around that. But identifying goals and going after them — using failure to guide us and success to inspire us — is the only way we’ll create thriving communities.

Jane Ellen Stevens is founder and publisher of ACEs Connection, a community of practice social network that helps communities integrate practices and policies based on the science of adverse childhood experiences. ACEs Connection is supported by funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, The California Endowment, the Sarlo Foundation, the Lisa & John Pritzker Family Fund, and Genentech. Stevens has been a health, science and technology journalist for more than 30 years. Her articles have appeared in the Boston Globe, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and National Geographic.

 

Resilience Power Tools Katie O’Shea, Tom Cloyd, Harvey Caine | Harvest Room

When a trauma occurs, we have an innate need to review the experience in detail to determine what was and wasn’t dangerous, and what we can’t and can do in the future to protect ourselves and others. To optimize this review, participants will learn powerful tools that update and reduce responses to trauma and enhance resiliency for themselves and others.

Katie O’Shea, MS, LCPC, has provided clinical and consultation services for over 40 years in child abuse/neglect, addictions, learning disabilities, somatic disorders, and war trauma (veterans and families). She is the EMDR Consultant for the Southwest Idaho Trauma Recovery Network, and originated the EMDR Early Trauma Protocol. She has presented at Regional, Canadian, European, and EMDRIA Conferences since 1997.

Trauma psychotherapist Tom Cloyd does clinical work and research in the Spokane, WA region, with special emphasis on strictly evidence-based, “best practices” approaches to treating posttraumatic stress disorder and dissociative identity disorder. A former cultural anthropologist, he has a particular interest in the evolution of our society’s views of mental illness and health and what it collectively does about both.

Harvey Caine has been helping people resolve physical and emotional traumas for 40 years. As a Certified Counselor and Licensed Massage Therapist, he has a unique understanding of the interconnectiveness of emotional and physical trauma. He’s taught his “Purpose of Emotions” and “Prep for Learning” curriculum at a Spokane High School, and is committed to helping young people resolve trauma.

Building Protective Factors to Fight the Impact of Child Abuse and Neglect | Minerva Pardo | Spruce Room

In this session participants learn the five protective factors. They also learn to shift the lens and the way they see all families. They will learn about how to build the protective factors in the work they do and be able to strengthen families reducing the likelihood of child abuse and neglect.

Minerva Pardo became a certified trainer of the Strengthening Families Protective Factors Framework three years ago. I have provided training to staff and providers on how to build the protective factors in their work to prevent abuse and neglect which eventually affect the child’s optimal development. Abuse and neglect end up being the trauma that affects children’s development and health in adult life.

Strategic Planning for High Expectations in a Trauma-Informed School | Venetia Willis-Holbrook | Sage Room

How does a trauma-informed school maintain high expectations for students? For an urban reengagement program in Western WA, the answer is strategic planning. Learn how to strategically plan, identify meaningful data points, and communicate progress to improve student outcomes. Tools and protocols to develop and communicate program mission, vision, and outcomes will be shared to use in your program.

Venetia Willis-Holbrook MS Ed is Supervisor of Secondary Initiatives for Clover Park School District. She is site administrator for the CPSD Open Doors Program, a youth reengagement program serving youth ages 16-21 in Lakewood, WA. In three years the program graduated over 113 students, reflecting one of the strongest 4-year and 5-year grad rates in similar reengagement programs in the state.

Responding to Naysayers: What to say when you’re told “This doesn’t work” | Anastasia Kibby | Oak Room

Anyone who has begun the journey to becoming trauma-informed knows it does not come without challenge and frustration. Many of our co-workers, friends, and even ourselves have begun to question if we can actually be trauma-informed. This session is an opportunity to feel validated, supported, and offer solutions to responding to naysayers and staying motivated on this transformative journey.

Anastasia Kibby is a current student seeking her Master of Social Work. She has been working with trauma-impacted youth for over four years, serving in residential treatment, child welfare, and community settings. She is constantly striving for an increased awareness and understanding of trauma-informed care and values human relationships above all else. Anastasia’s self-care includes hiking, kayaking, and traveling.

Community Track Session: A Trusted Adult: Bring the Hood, Back to the Child| Marcella Maggio | Design Room

Inspired by Mister Rogers Neighborhood, which understood the importance of community, this workshop defines what a Trusted Adult is and how rallying together to educate and raise a child not only promotes the youth’s safety and wellness, but the neighborhoods. When Trusted Adults show up and team up, neighborhood youth receive the message that adults care and community matters.

Since 2008, Marcella Maggio has led workshops throughout San Diego about child abuse, relationship violence, sexual assault, and resiliency filtered with informative tips and real-talks to engage participants. Every curricula and activity developed, incorporates community-driven research findings, current events, and trauma-informed care. Ms. Maggio’s greatest strength lies in her ability to translate prevention strategies into relatable material for anyone.

 

Breaking Down Silos: Trauma-Informed Approaches at the Local, State, and Federal Level  |  Kelly Jedd McKenzie, Erin Ingoldsby|  Pine Room

Communities across the country are implementing exciting trauma-informed initiatives. However, silos remain between communities, sectors, and agencies, who are not always aware of each other’s work. This session will highlight insights learned from a federal project developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), and share innovative practices and common elements of successful trauma-informed initiatives.

Kelly Jedd McKenzie, Ph.D., a Society for Research in Child Development Policy Fellow at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, works on policy related to childhood trauma. As an undergraduate, she served as one of CRI’s first interns and helped in the early development of CRI. She earned her PhD in child development, studying the effects of early adversity on brain development.

Erin Ingoldsby, Ph.D., is a Senior Research Associate at James Bell Associates and a child clinical psychologist. She leads evaluations and works closely with federal grantees working to implement trauma-informed approaches in state and community systems. In the recent past, she evaluated an initiative to integrate trauma training, screening, and evidence-based mental health interventions in a county child welfare system.

Music is Healing | Whitney Howey | Project Room

This is an experiential session where the attendees will participate in music therapy activities.The goal of this presentation is to provide information and examples of the effects (positive and negative) of music and the healing powers of music in our own lives and in a therapeutic/treatment environment. The presentation will incorporate safe touch and its relation to music.

Whitney Howey received a BS in Psychology from Utah State University in 2012 and a Master in Social Work in 2017. She has worked for the State of Utah as a Division of Child & Family Services Caseworker and worked with at-risk populations her whole career. Whitney is a board member for The Utah Network on Juveniles Offending Sexually. She is currently working at Youth Health Associates, Lakeside where she began her journey with our youth as an Intern in 2016.

4:00-4:30PM

Prep activity for Keynote day 2 | Teri Barila and Anne Nelson | Olympic/Gold Rooms

Our stories are powerful as they inspire others to address change. How do we tell them in concise and meaningful ways? In this mini-session, we will demonstrate a simple framework for telling a compelling success story and we will practice using it in preparation for those interested in tomorrow’s keynote presentation. Join us for a fun, engaging session where you’ll gain a valuable skill that you can take home and share with others in your organization.

5:00-7:00PM

Wednesday June 26, 2019 5pm Film Screenings | Project Rooms

 Paper Tigers a film by James Redford of KPJR Films. 1 hour 40 minute runtime, andResilience: the Biology of and the Science of Hope, the sequel to Paper Tigers, produced by Karen Pritzker and filmed by James Redford of KPJR Films. 1 hour runtime.

We are fortunate to have current staff from Lincoln High School and a former student join us for the screenings. The two documentary films by KPJR and directed by Jamie Redford will be offered concurrently.

Shelly Phipps, Intervention Specialist; and Dianna Cardenas, Lincoln graduate of 2014 will open the Paper Tigers screening. Shelly and Dianna will each share their personal thoughts on their respective journeys since Paper Tigers was released. Shelly and Dianna were both involved in the original production of the documentary.

Jayne Eacker and Erica (Riki) Wauchek will introduce the film Resilience. Jayne is a National Board Certified Teacher in Art for adolescent and young adults, a CTE certified instructor and currently in a master’s program that focuses on trauma and resilience in educational settings. Riki has a Masters Degree in Special Education and is an English/Drama teacher, Senior Adviser, master scheduler and produces a major play or musical every year using theater and the arts to build resilience.  Both are deeply committed to the ongoing practice of building resilience and life skills as they work with students. They will share thoughts on the path Lincoln High School has experienced, post- Paper Tigers.


JUNE 27, 2019 SESSIONS:

7:30-8:30AM

Morning Mindfulness | Teresa Posakony | Pool Area

N.E.A.R. to YOU Mindfulness Practice:

Join our inspiring morning awareness and mindfulness practice.  Come understand NEAR Science through guided movement and mindfulness exercises.  Deepen your understanding of your own inner state and expand your capacity for connection, learning, health, and growth – FLOURISHING! Consider joining a 6 week community of practice to grow your personal Resilience well beyond the conference.

Teresa Posakony is passionate about building healthy and resilient communities and organizations. She consults and teaches from the self-healing communities model founded by the FPC Community Networks which includes living systems, complexity, community engagement, dialogic organization development, and NEAR Science solutions.  She loves facilitating the statewide community of practice for ACEs and Resilience, and teaching neuroscience-based mindfulness practices.

8:30-9:45AM

Breakfast and Keynote: “Stages for Ages,” Part 2Teri Barila, Rick Griffin with Selected Participants | Olympic/Gold Rooms

Conference participants will have a chance to highlight their “stages for ages” work – capturing their work within the eight stages. Learn from other community examples and cheer on those willing to share their experiences on stage as they “strive to thrive” in their respective worlds and work. Instructions for how to participate are included in the Social Networking activity Tuesday evening, and via displays and a special mini-event Wednesday at 4pm.

10:00-11:30AM

Big IdeaStrategy Room: Speed Gaming | Teri Barila | Bronze Room

Remember Speed Dating? Well, neither do we, but an exclusive first at this year’s conference is our version called Speed Gaming, without the embarrassing questions, geeky outfits, or overblown claims that one had to sit through with Speed Dating!

Instead of a row of bachelors facing you, we will have Resilience Strategies games set up to play in 15-minute rounds. Go from “Resilience Trumps ACEs” to “Resilience City” and on to “Battle ACEs” and enjoy having fun while being exposed to our resilience deck of cards and games. You’ll also be able to check out how to throw a “Resilience Treasure Hunt” party or practice Resilience Strategies from the 180-day perpetual calendar. Want to know how to host a Celebration Station? Run a Restoration Mat? We’ll have all these set up to explore! And don’t leave this session until you have experienced the “Energy Stick” exercise.

CRI is recognized for its unique approach in building strategies and practices based on the sciences represented in the acronym NEAR– neuroscience, epigenetics, ACEs and Resilience. We build on that basis by adding our experience with community capacity building and attention to the broader aspect of contextual community resilience. This session will expose you to some of our Big Ideas that have shaped our community movement.

Come have fun and learn at the Speed Gaming! Session. Another BIG IDEA in the BIG ROOM!

Teri Barila is a co-founder and current CEO of the Community Resilience Initiative.  She holds a MS in Fisheries Management and a BS in Biology. She uses her science background to communicate with precision the science of ACEs and resilience.  She is involved extensively in training, consulting, writing and researching in the area of trauma, resilience and community capacity building. Her work has attracted attention in a variety of venues, in part due to the focus Teri places on grassroots organizational development and the focus on the hope of Resilience.

 

Connecting the Dots | Rick Griffin | Harvest Room

Would you try and cut down a tree with a butter knife?  Then don’t use subpar trauma-informed strategies. Course 3 is the power tool you have been waiting for.  In this session Rick will share an overview of the promising approaches that serve as the foundation for the strategies in CRI’s third signature course, Trauma Practitioners.

Rick Griffin is currently a CRI Master Trainer. Rick holds a Masters degree in Education and uses his education to develop cutting-edge content and to deliver engaging presentations. He speaks to thousands of groups all over the country and is widely recognized for his work with trauma-informed practices.  His experience allows him to consult seamlessly with schools, businesses, and community organizations.

Adverse Childhood Experiences, Acculturative Stress and Chronic Pain Among the Latinx Community | Cheryl Lopez | Spruce Room

This presentation highlights the growing medical and mental health risk factors among the Latinx community. Current literature about the impact of acculturative stress among Latinx immigrants and the exacerbation of trauma symptoms will be reviewed. Presenters will highlight culturally sensitive approaches to increase resilience and decrease stressors among a marginalized population who are at risk of early mortality and chronic medical conditions.

Cheryl Lopez, LCSW is a Spanish-speaking social worker who is a Sanctuary train the trainer, and pursuing her Doctorate in Social Welfare (DSW) in Clinical Social Work at NYU. Cheryl’s career has focused on advancing trauma-informed clinical practices to diverse population and ages. Clinical interests include culturally sensitive practices to help empower communities.

A Trauma-Informed Approach to Homelessness | Daniel Goya | Sage Room

The problem in serving homeless families with young children is that government and non-profit work can, “work in silos.” Come and see how we solved this problem by creating a comprehensive mobile homeless family education program that embeds Native Hawaiian culture.

Daniel Goya: In Hawaii, in 2007, homeless families with young children was at a “near epidemic” level. A school teacher and youth pastor by trade, I left my profession to join the Partners in Development Foundation to create a Two-gen homeless family education program. (www.pidfoundation.org). Through this process, I became a certified National Center for Family Learning certified trainer to implement a two-gen model that included Adult and Parent Education, Center-based preschool and Parent and Children Together Time. In addressing needs identified by the community, this mobile traveling program developed a STEM and health and wellness curriculum that embeds the Native Hawaiian culture. Seeing the need to address trauma in our families (average ACE score of six) in 2018 went through two of three certified training courses from the Community Resilience Initiative. I am a secondary-trained educator (17 years) and have an advanced degree in education curriculum from the University of Hawaii and a minor in Hawaiian Ethnic Studies.

Teaching Resilience in a Treatment-based Resource Room | Lauren Nichols, Christina Brando-Subis | Oak Room

Trauma informed teachers are looking for specific methods to integrate resilience and emotional regulation into the classroom. Based on a therapeutic classroom experience designed by the presenters, these techniques are for use in a resource classroom, but many can be used in the regular classroom. We will discuss the methods used and the the trauma theories behind them.

Lauren Nichols is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and a certified secondary teacher in Idaho. She currently teaches Social Work at Lewis-Clark State College. She worked as a therapist for 15 years in a day treatment, school setting, with children who had experienced complex trauma.

 

Christina Brando-Subis taught elementary students with severe trauma for eight years, partnering with counselors and other professionals to create safe and therapeutic classroom environments. She now teaches at Lewis-Clark State College in the Elementary Education Teacher Education program.

Community Track Session: Can One Story Change Everything? Creating Large-scale System Change in Alberta | Dr. Nicole Sherran | Design Room

The Alberta Family Wellness Initiative (AFWI) is a social innovation platform designed to turn “what we know” about the science of early brain development into “what we do” for children and families. Using knowledge mobilization and catalytic convening to cultivate and support change agents, the AFWI has helped embed this science into public policy, programs, and professional practices across sectors.

Dr. Nicole Sherren is the Scientific Director and Senior Program Officer with the Palix Foundation. Nicole joined Palix in 2007 to focus on mobilizing the science of early brain development into policy and professional practice. She delivers numerous workshops across the health, education, and human service sectors each year, and assists organizations in applying the science in their own settings.

 

Working with Trauma and Resilience within the LGBTQ+ Community Heather Rodriguez, MSW, LICSW, CMHS, CCTP | Pine Room

Research has demonstrated that LGBTQ+ populations are at increased risk for both mental and physical health issues and experience a significant level of discrimination and oppression in addition to potential compounding factors as it relates to Adverse Childhood Experiences and complex trauma. This workshop will provide a basic overview of current terminology/language, significant risk factors and service and treatment considerations within the cultural context of working with LGBTQ+ individuals in order to improve mental health outcomes and resiliency, access to care and reduce stigma and discrimination.

Heather Rodriguez currently works as an Assistant Professor of Social Work at The Wilma Hepker School of Social Work and Sociology at Walla Walla University.  She is a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker, Child Mental Health Specialist and a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional. She was formerly the Mental Health Clinical Supervisor and Early Head Start Mental Health Consultant for Children’s Home Society of Washington for 10 years.  Heather Rodriguez has been working in the mental health field with children and families for the past 19 years, specializing in the area of trauma and sexual abuse recovery.  Heather Rodriguez is active advocate in the local LGBTQ+ community and the co-founder and former Program Coordinator of Children’s Home Society’s Triple Point program in Walla Walla. Triple Point serves youth who identify within the LGBTQ+ community (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer…) and/or are questioning, including straight allies.

 

Minnesota’s School-based Model of Diversion for Youth with Co-occurring Disorders | Charlene Myklebust, Julie Atella | Project Room

The “pipeline” is a concern that requires analysis and solutions for children and families. Practices that push at-risk students to the juvenile justice system have negative consequences, especially for students of color, the poor, and the disabled. We are a SAMHSA and MacArthur Foundation site selected to initiate a diversion model for students with mental and chemical health disorders.

Charlene Myklebust is President of Professional Education Pal, LLC. She was an English and special education teacher, school administrator, mental and chemical health provider, and executive director of mental health and partnerships. Char was recognized for “Outstanding Service” by the Minnesota Association for Children’s Mental Health and “Educator of the Year” by the National Alliance on Mental Illness in Minnesota.

Julie Atella is a Research Scientist with Wilder Research in St. Paul, Minnesota. Her work focuses on juvenile justice research and evaluation. Julie also teaches at Metro State University in Minnesota. Julie obtained her Master of Arts degree in Criminal Justice from Washington State University and holds a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from the University of California at Riverside.

11:30AM-12:30PM

Lunch & Stages for Ages Work Session and Reflection Teri Barila and Anne Nelson | Olympic Gold Room

Join Teri and Anne as they reflect on the conference theme and develop an action plan for when participants return home. Anne will use the 7-Story Sentence in small group exercises to hone in on how we “go home and make something happen” with a broader awareness gleaned from this conference.

12:30-2:00PM

Big Idea Rebuilding Lives while Building Homes: Tony McGuire’s Resilience-Building Carpentry Class| Tony McGuire | Bronze Room

Tony McGuire is a great carpenter. He ran his own construction business for years. Then he wanted to get into teaching. He became a Tenured Faculty member at a local community college, and landed in the state penitentiary as a Basic Skills Carpentry instructor. So how could that be connected to saving lives with a 20 buck investment?

Tony got touched by CRI’s trauma-informed training. He saw himself past and present and knew somehow that, “with this information comes the responsibility to use it,” a common phrase used with the trauma movement.

And then he learned about the 52 card deck, a $20 purchase available from CRI.

He connected the dots- and thus the brilliance of his “how I will use this” motto- and saw how he could help prepare the men in his carpentry class for life outside the penitentiary. From his own lived experience, he saw what it would mean if he could build in to his classes, at least the 42 resilience strategies highlighted in the deck of cards (the other 10 represent the ACEs from the original study). He knew from his own life how critical the ability to regulate, recognize and manage emotions, and role model these skills to others was. He had lived this; now he could begin to pay it forward to men whom he knew had missed the opportunity to have these critical life skills built into their development. He also knew it was not too late to get started.

Join Tony as he tells his personal journey on this path we call “trauma-informed care” and “resilience-building.”  He shares his stories of witnessing adult men have their own personal “a-ha” moments, in connecting those same dots- recognizing the feeling, connecting it, and pausing the knee-jerk reactive mode to a deep breathing. By teaching “I can handle this” mode, Tony began to save lives.

The story has since grown within the Department of Corrections systems with a request for Tony to share this story, then within the community college system, and finally to the Achieving the Dream conference which is about student success nationally.

So- what does a great carpenter do? He re-builds lives destroyed by trauma. That is even more powerful than building a home.

Read more about Tony from ACEsConnection’s very own Jane Stevens

Tony McGuire is the Building Maintenance Technology Instructor for Walla Walla Community College and teaches Basic Carpentry Skills at the Washington State Penitentiary in Walla Walla.  With more than 22 years of experience in the construction trades, he literally built his career with his own two hands.  Tony is as talented with his words as he is with his hands.  As an accomplished presenter with scores of practical experience with ACEs and Resilience, Tony educates and entertains his audiences. His most transforming trauma-informed work takes place on a daily basis with his students from Washington State Penitentiary, where he uses CRI  resilience materials to teach life skill resilience strategies for employability when inmates return to civilian life. Tony speaks to the benefit his focus on resilience as a life skill, tied to work force and employment, is making with the men he teaches daily. Learn more about Tony’s approach to teaching resilience strategies here…

 

From Coaching to the Classroom – Taking the tips I used to develop a winning culture on the court to create a thriving classroom culture | Allyn Griffin | Harvest Room

Attendees receive a blend of science, motivation and educational strategies on teaching student-athletes healthy and effective ways of responding to the stressful situations of competitive sports and academics. A veteran coach and former professional athlete, Allyn uses his personal experiences and CRI structures to address the challenges of becoming a resilient student and teammate.

Allyn Griffin A secondary teacher who also teaches basketball. He competently utilizes strategies helping parents, students and athletes understand and support the child’s athletic and academic growth. Over twenty years in the organization, strategic planning, management and peripheral responsibilities of coaching. A collaborative, passionate, motivating leader who has been officially commended by colleagues for ingenuity and a high degree of professionalism.

Adverse Childhood Experiences, Acculturative Stress and Chronic Pain Among the Latinx Community | Cheryl Lopez, Leslie Peña-Sullivan | Spruce Room

This presentation highlights the growing medical and mental health risk factors among the Latinx community. Current literature about the impact of acculturative stress among Latinx immigrants and the exacerbation of trauma symptoms will be reviewed. Presenters will highlight culturally sensitive approaches to increase resilience and decrease stressors among a marginalized population who are at risk of early mortality and chronic medical conditions.

Cheryl Lopez, LCSW and Leslie Peña-Sullivan, LCSW are both Spanish-speaking social workers pursuing their Doctorate in Social Welfare (DSW) in Clinical Social Work at NYU. Cheryl’s career has focused on providing trauma-informed clinical care to diverse populations and ages. Leslie completed a Clinical Social Work Fellowship at the Yale Child Study Center where she trained in providing trauma treatment.

Leslie’s photo available soon…

A Trauma-Informed Approach to Homelessness| Daniel Goya | Sage Room

The problem in serving homeless families with young children is that government and non-profit work can, “work in silos.” Come and see how we solved this problem by creating a comprehensive mobile homeless family education program that embeds Native Hawaiian culture.

Daniel Goya: In Hawaii, in 2007, homeless families with young children was at a “near epidemic” level. A school teacher and youth pastor by trade, I left my profession to join the Partners in Development Foundation to create a Two-gen homeless family education program. (www.pidfoundation.org). Through this process, I became a certified National Center for Family Learning certified trainer to implement a two-gen model that included Adult and Parent Education, Center-based preschool and Parent and Children Together Time. In addressing needs identified by the community, this mobile traveling program developed a STEM and health and wellness curriculum that embeds the Native Hawaiian culture. Seeing the need to address trauma in our families (average ACE score of six) in 2018 went through two of three certified training courses from the Community Resilience Initiative. I am a secondary-trained educator (17 years) and have an advanced degree in education curriculum from the University of Hawaii and a minor in Hawaiian Ethnic Studies.

Teaching Resilience in a Treatment-based Resource Room | Lauren Nichols, Christina Brando-Subis | Oak Room

Trauma informed teachers are looking for specific methods to integrate resilience and emotional regulation into the classroom. Based on a therapeutic classroom experience designed by the presenters, these techniques are for use in a resource classroom, but many can be used in the regular classroom. We will discuss the methods used and the the trauma theories behind them.

Lauren Nichols is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and a certified secondary teacher in Idaho. She currently teaches Social Work at Lewis-Clark State College. She worked as a therapist for 15 years in a day treatment, school setting, with children who had experienced complex trauma.

 

Christina Brando-Subis taught elementary students with severe trauma for eight years, partnering with counselors and other professionals to create safe and therapeutic classroom environments. She now teaches at Lewis-Clark State College in the Elementary Education Teacher Education program.

Community Track Session:  The Story Project | Adán Suárez, Melissa Wisner, Ursula Volwiler | Design Room

Do you want to go deep with people?  What if you could enhance shalom in your community, would you endeavor in it?  This session is intended to give you a perspective of our journey in fostering growth of a holistic, flourishing community through story capture, a qualitative research methodology designed by Opportunity International.  The power of listening to stories can significantly inform the work we do to help bring shalom to relationships.

Adán Suárez for the last six years has worked for C.A.S.A. LLC, a faith-based community development organization.  He is a former migrant educator, holds an MA in Education Leadership and a BA in education.  With his work primarily focused in Tierra Vida, he has learned so much about community building and feels that true community building is done through getting to know others.

Melissa Wisner works as the community life coordinator in Vista Hermosa, a FirstFruits Community in Prescott, WA. In that role she works with migrant farm-worker families who diligently work every day to create a flourishing apple orchard. She studied community development at Eastern University and is passionate about learning how we can create flourishing communities together.

Ursula Volwiler works as a neighborhood outreach organizer for Commitment to Community (C2C) in Walla Walla, WA. C2C is a program of Blue Mountain Action Council, a community service organization that helps low-income people meet their needs and achieve self-sufficiency. Ursula is excited about launching the Story Project in her neighborhood as a pilot with the goal to expand it to other C2C neighborhoods. 

 

 

Working with Trauma and Resilience within the LGBTQ+ Community Heather Rodriguez, MSW, LICSW, CMHS, CCTP | Pine Room

Research has demonstrated that LGBTQ+ populations are at increased risk for both mental and physical health issues and experience a significant level of discrimination and oppression in addition to potential compounding factors as it relates to Adverse Childhood Experiences and complex trauma. This workshop will provide a basic overview of current terminology/language, significant risk factors and service and treatment considerations within the cultural context of working with LGBTQ+ individuals in order to improve mental health outcomes and resiliency, access to care and reduce stigma and discrimination.

Heather Rodriguez currently works as an Assistant Professor of Social Work at The Wilma Hepker School of Social Work and Sociology at Walla Walla University.  She is a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker, Child Mental Health Specialist and a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional. She was formerly the Mental Health Clinical Supervisor and Early Head Start Mental Health Consultant for Children’s Home Society of Washington for 10 years.  Heather Rodriguez has been working in the mental health field with children and families for the past 19 years, specializing in the area of trauma and sexual abuse recovery.  Heather Rodriguez is active advocate in the local LGBTQ+ community and the co-founder and former Program Coordinator of Children’s Home Society’s Triple Point program in Walla Walla. Triple Point serves youth who identify within the LGBTQ+ community (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer…) and/or are questioning, including straight allies.

Minnesota’s School-based Model of Diversion for Youth with Co-occurring Disorders | Charlene Myklebust, Julie Atella | Project Room

The “pipeline” is a concern that requires analysis and solutions for children and families. Practices that push at-risk students to the juvenile justice system have negative consequences, especially for students of color, the poor, and the disabled. We are a SAMHSA and MacArthur Foundation site selected to initiate a diversion model for students with mental and chemical health disorders.

Charlene Myklebust is President of Professional Education Pal, LLC. She was an English and special education teacher, school administrator, mental and chemical health provider, and executive director of mental health and partnerships. Char was recognized for “Outstanding Service” by the Minnesota Association for Children’s Mental Health and “Educator of the Year” by the National Alliance on Mental Illness in Minnesota.

Julie Atella is a Research Scientist with Wilder Research in St. Paul, Minnesota. Her work focuses on juvenile justice research and evaluation. Julie also teaches at Metro State University in Minnesota. Julie obtained her Master of Arts degree in Criminal Justice from Washington State University and holds a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from the University of California at Riverside.

2:15-2:30PM

Closing Ceremony | Olympic/Gold Rooms

Join an interactive exit exercise where we capture your “a-ha” moment of the Stages for Ages experience. Help us shape a Word Cloud to send you as a reminder of the conference!

**Sessions and schedule are subject to change